5 May 1215

Rebel barons renounce their allegiance to King John of England — part of a chain of events leading to the signing of the Magna Carta.

The Magna Carta is a historical document that was signed in England in 1215. It is also known as the Great Charter and is considered one of the most important legal documents in history. The Magna Carta was created to limit the power of King John of England and to protect the rights of the people.

The document contained 63 clauses, which set out the rights of the church, the barons, and the people. It also established the principle that everyone, including the king, was subject to the law. Some of the key provisions in the Magna Carta included:

The right to a fair trial by jury
Protection against arbitrary imprisonment
Limits on the power of the king to impose taxes and fines
Protection of the rights of widows and heirs
The guarantee of safe passage for those seeking justice

Although the Magna Carta was initially intended to address the concerns of a small group of nobles, its principles had a lasting impact on the development of democratic institutions and the protection of individual rights. It influenced the development of the English legal system and inspired similar documents, such as the United States Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

5 May 2010

Mass protests in Greece erupt in response to austerity measures imposed by the government as a result of the Greek government-debt crisis.\

[rdp-wiki-embed url=’https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-austerity_movement_in_Greece’]

5 May 1964

The Council of Europe announces May 5 as Europe Day.

Europe Day is the name of an annual observance by the European Union, held on 9 May. It is also known as Schuman Day, in commemoration of the 1950 Schuman Declaration. It is the EU’s “equivalent of a national day”, and its observance is strongly associated with the display of the EU’s equivalent of a national flag, the “European flag or emblem”.

Other days called “Europe Day” include a 5 May observance by the Council of Europe introduced in 1964, and a holiday introduced by Ukraine in 2003 held on the third Saturday of March.

The Council of Europe was founded on 5 May 1949, and hence it chose that day for its celebrations when it established the holiday in 1964.

The “Europe Day” of the EU was introduced in 1985 by the European Communities the predecessor organisation of the EU. The date of commemorates the Schuman Declaration of 9 May 1950. The declaration proposed the pooling of French and West German coal and steel industries, leading to the creation of the European Coal and Steel Community, the first European Community, established in 1952.

A “raft of cultural icons” was launched by the European Commission in 1985, in reaction to the report by the ad-hoc commission “for a People’s Europe” chaired by Pietro Adonnino. The aim was to facilitate European integration by fostering a Pan-European identity among the populations of the EC member states. The European Council adopted “Europe Day” along with the flag of Europe technically not called a “flag” but an “emblem” and other items on 29 September 1985 in Milan.

Following the foundation of the European Union in 1993, observance of Europe Day by national and regional authorities increased significantly. Germany in particular has gone beyond celebrating just the day, since 1995 extending the observance to an entire “Europe Week” centered on 9 May. In Poland, the Schuman Foundation, a Polish organisation advocating European integration established in 1991, first organised its Warsaw Schuman Parade on Europe Day 1999, at the time advocating the accession of Poland to the EU. Observance of 9 May as “Europe Day” was reported “across Europe” as of 2008. The EU’s choice of the date of foundation of the European Coal and Steel Community rather than that of the EU itself established a narrative in which Schuman’s speech, concerned with inducing economic growth and cementing peace between France and Germany, is presented as anticipating a “vocation of the European Union to be the main institutional framework” for the much further-reaching European integration of later decades.

The European Constitution would have legally enshrined all the European symbols in the EU treaties, however the treaty failed to be ratified in 2005, and usage would continue only in the present de facto manner. The Constitution’s replacement, the Treaty of Lisbon, contains a declaration by sixteen members supporting the symbols. The European Parliament “formally recognised” Europe Day in October 2008.

5 May 2010

Protests in Greece take place in response to austerity measures imposed by the government.

World markets plunge over fears that Greece’s economic crisis will spread to other countries despite austerity measures.In a dramatic escalation of the anger unleashed by the economic crisis engulfing Greece, communist protesters stormed the Acropolis today as the euro and world markets plunged on concerns about the debt-choked country’s huge bailout from the EU and the IMF.

Irate trade unionists took over Athens’ ancient landmark as fury over an unprecedented package of austerity measures, agreed in return for a multibillion euro aid package from eurozone nations and the IMF, intensified.

By the break of dawn the citadel’s ramparts had been draped with banners proclaiming: “Peoples of Europe rise up.”

Fears that the Greek crisis will spread to other countries sent markets reeling around the world today. The FTSE 100 in London closed down 142 points and, in New York, American markets fell by more than 2% as investors worried that a failure to push through austerity measures in Greece will lead to a spiralling loss of confidence in other indebted countries.

In Athens, protesting public sector workers said their action had been prompted by “blind anger” over the near-bankrupt government’s decision to accept the painful policies.

The measures, which are aimed at bringing Greece’s public deficit within permissible EU levels by 2014, through a tough cost-cutting regime worth €30bn (£25bn), have hit civil servants the hardest.

Furious Greeks have likened the three-year austerity programme and the attendant international monitoring of their public finances, to a foreign occupation.